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Anxiety Triggers

Anxiety Triggers

Health issues

A health diagnosis that’s upsetting or difficult, such as cancer or a chronic illness, may trigger anxiety or make it worse. This type is very powerful because of the immediate and personal feelings it produces.

Medication

Certain prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) medications may trigger symptoms of anxiety. That’s because active ingredients in these medications may make you feel uneasy or unwell.

Caffeine

Many people rely on their morning cup of coffee to wake up, but it might actually trigger or worsen anxiety. People with panic disorder and social anxiety are especially sensitive to the anxiety-inducing effects of caffeine.

Skipping meals

When you don’t eat, your blood sugar may drop. That can lead to jittery hands and a rumbling tummy. It can also trigger anxiety.

Negative thinking

Your mind controls much of your body, and that’s certainly true with anxiety. When you’re upset or frustrated, the words you say to yourself can trigger greater feelings of anxiety.

Financial concerns

Worries about saving money and having debt can trigger anxiety. Unexpected bills or money fears are triggers, too.

Parties or social events

If a room full of strangers doesn’t sound like fun, you’re not alone. Events that require you to make small talk or interact with people you don’t know can trigger feelings of anxiety, which may be diagnosed as social anxiety disorder.

Conflict

Relationship problems, arguments, disagreements – these conflicts can all trigger or worsen anxiety. If conflict particularly triggers you, you need to learn conflict resolution strategies.

Stress

Daily stressors like traffic jams or missing your train can cause anyone anxiety. But long-term or chronic stress can lead to long-term anxiety and worsening symptoms, as well as other health problems.

Public events or performances

Public speaking, talking in front of your boss, performing in a competition, or even just reading aloud is a common trigger of anxiety.

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Chris du Toit

✆  079 323 3042

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1st Floor,  Club House,  Golf Village,  2 De Beers Avenue,  Somerset West,  7130

Chris du Toit | South African Institute of Hypnotism

Tips for People with Social Anxiety

Tips for People with Social Anxiety

1. Remember everyone is self-conscious. Social anxiety is common, and many people experience it. If you’re at a party and feel really anxious about introducing yourself to new people, remember that other people might feel the same way.

2. Pause to examine the evidence. When you’re feeling anxious, take a moment and try identifying the anxious thoughts running through your head. Challenge them by asking questions such as: “What evidence do I have this is true?” and “Is there another explanation for what happened?” If someone responds curtly to you, you may have the anxious thought that “They think I’m boring.” What if you challenged that thought and instead considered another explanation: Maybe they were in a hurry, or maybe they were already on their way to talk to someone else when you approached them.

3. Imagine the worst-case scenario. Often, people with social anxiety think making a mistake will cause far worse consequences than it actually would. If you’re worried about something, such as stumbling over your words, ask what really would happen if you stumbled over your words. Would people really laugh at you? They’d probably barely notice it or quickly forget about it and continue the conversation.

4. Remind yourself anticipation is worse than reality. Often, our worries about an upcoming situation are worse than the situation itself. If you’re worried about striking up a conversation because you think you’ll have nothing to say, remind yourself that you only have to start with “Hello.” Once you begin the conversation, it gets a lot easier.

5. Bring a cheat sheet. Before going into an anxiety-inducing situation, anticipate what anxious thoughts you’ll have and challenge them on a piece of paper. Bring this piece of paper with you to the event. Then if you start feeling nervous, you can look at it to remind yourself of your thought challenges and calm yourself down.

6. Consider getting help. If you find social anxiety really is impacting your life (For instance, getting in the way of your career or relationships, or making it hard to go to social events you want to attend.), consider seeking help.

Ready to Improve Your Life?

Get in touch now

Chris du Toit

✆  079 323 3042

[email protected]hrishypnosis.com

1st Floor,  Club House,  Golf Village,  2 De Beers Avenue,  Somerset West,  7130

Chris du Toit | South African Institute of Hypnotism